Interview of G.García Márquez to Akira Kurosawa

In October 1990, in Tokyo, while Kurosawa was still filming his penultimate film, Rhapsody in August (Hachi-gatsu no kyōshikyoku, 1991), writer and director met to discuss the differences between literary and cinematographic language, and the difficulties of the adaptation of the first to the second.  On the occasion of the central topic of Rhapsody in August, they addressed the physical, spiritual and historical consequences of the Nagasaki nuclear bombing in 1945 and the reaction of the perpetrator, the United States: the establishment of a machinery of oblivion in Japan, under its auspices, in place of acceptance of his crime and publicly apologize; they also delved into the conditions of happiness, the limits of man, and, of course, the implications of this in art. It is a friendly duel between two of the sharpest and most passionate minds of his time, showing a deep concern to leave, through his work, a positive legacy for humanity.  This is a part of the interview. Continue reading Interview of G.García Márquez to Akira Kurosawa

Rituparno Ghosh – The ‘Enfant Terrible’ of Indian Cinema

By Amitava Nag

May has a very special connotation in the Bengali psyche. It is in this very month when two of Bengal’s brightest stars of the cultural sky were born – Rabindranath Tagore and Satyajit Ray. It is on a rainy day in the end of the same month two years back when Bengal lost its most versatile film-maker of contemporary times. It was a romantic rainy day in 2013 unlike the sweltering summer this year and I was driving to my office when the news of Rituparno Ghosh’s untimely death hit me quite hard, like many others. Two years later and the initial shock evaporated by now what does Rituparno Ghosh’s cinema mean to me? Continue reading Rituparno Ghosh – The ‘Enfant Terrible’ of Indian Cinema